BI905EE The Book of Revelation





Students develop an appreciation and understanding of the Book of Revelation by careful study of the text as Sacred Scripture. Homiletic considerations are a particular focus. The study of Revelation examines the pastoral challenges stemming from popular fundamentalist interpretations. Students also explore the impact of Revelation on worship, justice, and witness.


Course Syllabus

BI905EE The Book of Revelation

Love of the Word of God involves becoming ever more deeply informed about its origin, meaning, and application. This course is designed to give the participant an appreciation of the Book of Revelation by a careful study of the text as Sacred Scripture and how we approach its use as preachers and as a Church.

A study of Revelation will require careful thought about the pastoral problems caused by popular fundamentalist interpretations. In addition, the participant will learn how it has influenced Christian thinking about worship, justice, witness, and the linkages that must exist among them.

The course will cover the entire Book of Revelation and draw upon the disciplines of pastoral theology, moral theology and church literature. Students will be expected to participate in small-group discussions with collaborative effort among the group.

Course Description

Love of the Word involves becoming ever more deeply informed about its origin, meaning, and application. A careful study of the Book of Revelation is necessary not only for being equipped to preach on this text, but also for understanding the very nature of Sacred Scripture and how we approach it as a Church. A study of Revelation will require careful thought about the pastoral problems caused by popular fundamentalist interpretations of the book. But more importantly, you will see in studying this book that it has profoundly influenced Christian thinking about worship, justice, witness, and the linkages that must exist among them.

Included Topics

The following topics have been included in this course:

  • What is Revelation Actually About?
  • The Blowing of the Seven Trumpets

 

Revelation 8-11

  • Understanding Why Apocalyptic Literature Was Written as It Was
  • The Woman and the Dragon

 

Revelation 12:1-14:5

  • The Initial Vision

 

Revelation 1:9-20

  • The Pouring of the Seven Bowls

 

Revelation 14:6-17:18

  • Seven Letters to Seven Churches

 

Revelation 2-3

  • Lamentation and Rejoicing

 

Revelation 18:1-19:10

  • Heavenly Worship

 

Revelation 4

  • The End of the Word as We Know It

 

Revelation 19:11-21:8

  • Unsealing the Seven Seals

 

Revelation 6:1-8:5

  • The New Jerusalem and the End of Revelation

 

Revelation 21:1-22:21

 

Course Components

This course draws from the disciplines of

  •  Pastoral Theology · Literature
  •  Moral Theology

to emphasize the critical importance of the Word.

Course Material Integration

Materials used in this course will be drawn from:

  • Church documents,
  • Current research,
  • Assigned readings from websites and textbooks

Methodology

Every module contains a number of questions that are meant to engage you in an active encounter with the texts. It will be important to network with other members of the course (Triad Collaboration) in the Chat room and Forums to work collaboratively, asking each other for help in answering these questions (but only after you have given them your best shot. It is the process of dealing with the questions that is important – not merely the final answers you arrive at.)

Your facilitator will monitor these discussions and help if no one seems on target. Your facilitator will be careful to withhold direct answers until they are absolutely necessary.

Books to Buy The following books will be used throughout the course.

Revelation by Ben Witherington III (New Cambridge Bible Commentary) 2003, ISBN: 0521000688 .

The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha (Volume 1), editor, James H. Charlesworth, 1983, ISBN: 0385096305.

The New Oxford Annotated Bible. Third Edition, 2001, ISBN: 019528478X.

You are welcome to use a favorite study Bible, but for passages outside of Revelation it is important that this be a Bible with good notes such as the one above or the HarperCollins Study Bible. Do not use a Bible that is a paraphrase translation (e.g., Today’s English Version, Good News Bible, etc.) or an older version such as the Douay Rheims or King James Version (KJV). For linguistic analysis Revised Standard Version (RSV), New American Bible (NAB), New Revised Standard Version (NRSV), or New International Version (NIV) are best.

 







0 Comments